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this was not impersonal market forces, this was not technology, this was not globalization. what was happening was american politics and american economics were working against the middle class. people did this. we decided this. if you look at other countries like germany, their middle class is in better shape. they've done better trading against the world, their companies are making money. so a lot of the things we heard that were not impossible, not possible in america are actually happening in germany, and their wages have gone up five times faster that than ours. there's something wrong inside the american economic and political system, and that's what this book is about. >> host: hedrick smith is the author. thank you for being on booktv. >> from the fourth annual boston book festival, a panel featuring author edward glaeser. it's about an hour, 15. >> good afternoon and thank you very much for coming to this auditorium today. let me introduce myself, i'm bob oakes from morning edition on wbur, boston's npr news station. [applause] thank you. thank you. i'm sure some of you are saying, wo
, the technology revolution. and one reason i think that it's really pretty clear that those are key drivers is this is a global phenomenon. and i do sometimes think the american discourse about it tends to be very american. so i'm always quite entertained when i read about, you know, a paper that says rising income inequality in the united states is due to this one particular law passed in the 980s. -- 1980s. okay, then how does that account for rising income inequality in canada or, indeed, even in france, in germany, in the united kingdom? i mean, it's happening all over the world, it's also happening in emerging markets. but i think it is important to face that scary because if you see it just as a political phenomenon, you know, you're going to lose sight of what i think is the biggest challenge which is that these, actually, quite benign economic forces, right? i love the technology revolution, i'm a google addict. they're also drivers of social and political consequences which are not quite so benign. the way i like to look at it, and this is a quote from peter orszag, is, you know, h
the decision, you will probably reach a different decision about that toxic technology. how it is being produced, letting people make their decisions makes quite a difference. this gets done now. where to produce. of the workers in every enterprise made a decision where to produce, how many would close the factory and move to china? i would guess probably non. close to zero. what of thought, that the workers who had to live with a factory that closes, live in a community that will be affected by factories the close, and workers themselves make the decision. here is another one. for chris decide what to do with the profits, here's an interesting thing we expect. over the last 30 years with boards of directors, we have noticed something i am sure you have all noticed, the boards of directors decided to use the profits they were earning to give enormous increases in the salaries to top executives. we are famous in america for that. thee aratio of one executive ge to an average worker is 300 to 40s all other countries. so we have been in a major part of the ineq0 lity that i talked about be
of -- stems? raise your hand. stands for science, technology, engineering and math, and these are the jobs which are going to be around in the future. actual he the key jobs of the new jersey economy and we should all go to our local councils, our partner organizations, and we're trying to incorporate the significance of stem within schools and colleges around the city, and i challenge every single youth parliament member here today to go away to your cities and councils and partner organizations and try to encourage them to incorporate the significance of stem program within your schools and colleges and come back next year and share with us what you found. these are the jobs of the knowledge economy. >> now, i'm looking for a london woman. a london woman who has not spoken before. have you spoken before? you did. i think it wouldn't be fair to others. i thought you had spoken earlier. this woman is going to fall off her seat and i want to see that. that would be a sadness. >> i'm -- thank you, mr. speaker. thank you. [applause] >> anybody here who knows today that i was desperate to pike
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4